Telephoto Lens Cap for Canon & Nikon Camera Lenses

Posts Tagged 'photography'

A Photographer’s Life in the Bush – What A Week!

Well, you can say, “It has been one of those weeks.” Those wonderful, “African Rains”, of which everyone dreams and Toto sings, have made a huge mud pit of the Mara, and it is the dry season!! At one point in my life, I thought it would be amazing to tough out the mess during the raining season, with big cats in a downpour and dramatic skies, but after this past week, I am rethinking that one. It had been raining for days when I first arrived at Little Mara Bush Camp. That was ok, as I had just finished 3 weeks in Ethiopia and could do with some down time, using the Internet to catch up on tons of emails. My mobile office there has a great view along the river, with Hippos to keep me entertained.

Little Mara Bush Camp
hippos at play
3_Piper_5E4A6968

After a hot day, which dried the roads a bit, I would venture out for an afternoon drive in the Landy. That, in itself, driving through the African plains, is incredible! I just started using infrared photography, so I was only looking for elephants or giraffes along the mass savannas with dramatic skies. Sometimes, I can wander out from camp and find them the minute I pop out of the bush, so I was happy to stay close to camp for a few days. However, on the third day, one of my external drives crashed. Then, while I was backing-up my back up, my computer crashed, or so I thought. Actually, it was not charging and simply died from running out of battery – Thank God! Once I got that all sorted, I was ready to race across the Mara, the next morning, in search of lions (Rekero pride with cubs) and Cheetahs (either Malika or Armani and their cubs). Well, of course, that night, we were pounded again with those wonderful African rains, hard enough to seem like a stage 5 hurricane.

At that point, it was time to pull on my big girl pants, put on my big rubber boots, and get out there to kick some *** anyway. So I did just that, except… I got stuck only a few km from camp! My windows were down in anticipation of quickly coming upon some great wildlife action, but all I managed to do was annihilate everything inside the Landy with mud! Luckily, my buddies from Intrepid camp came by within a few minutes. I threw on my rubbers, jumped out, chained up, and they pulled me out. Then, we proceeded to the Talek river, which was way too high, but since the Intrepid driver made it, I followed. Water flew up over my bonnet, and I was too focused on getting across to notice the water coming in along my floor. Yep, a lot got wet that shouldn’t have. A few hours later, we could no longer cross that river, so the adventure continued slipping, sliding, and driving sideways across the marshy plains. Finally, we made it across Olare Orak River and back into camp!!!
getting rescued
5_Piper_IMG_5181

All part of the adventure in the search for the perfect image and stories for the rocking chair!!

Here are a just a few of the infrared images I recently captured in the Maasai Mara. Visit my Piper Mackay Photography Facebook page to see a few I shot in the Omo Valley. I have a lot to learn about this new medium, but I am very excited about it.

8_Piper_IMG_0680-Edit-Edit
7_Piper_IMG_1213
6_Piper_IMG_1177

 


lens cap


 

Piper Mackay is a world, wildlife and cultural photographer, based in Long Beach, California. She believes compelling visual images help to protect what is right in the world. Her work takes her to very remote locations, living cross culturally in the villages and environments that she is documenting.

Her work is heavily concentrated on the African continent, a land she fell in love with when she first touched foot on it’s rich red soil. Her passion for the natural world has grown into a lifelong commitment to inspire others to explore, respect and preserve the beauty of our fragile planet.

She believes compelling work comes when you invest time, living the stories you are trying to tell. It is important to interact and gain the trust of those whose stories you are telling, especially when sensitive and complicated. The world has enough images of poverty, pain and disaster, much more needful is imagery that reveals the beauty and dignity of the communities that are, except by their geography and circumstances, very similar to our own. Powerful images help shape the view of the world and play an important role in disseminating how cultures and wildlife are coping with the rapid changes happening in the developing world.

Piper’s images have been displayed at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, The Museum of History and industry, and The Art Wolfe gallery, as well as local galleries. Her work has been featured in Nature and travel publication through representation of several photo agencies, including Rangefinder, Nature’s Best, Birders, and the World Wildlife Fund. She is an independent photographer and available for assignment work.

Her prior career in the fashion industry, where she was deeply involved with combing color and texture, has greatly enhanced her approach to the unique look and feel of each culture and photographic subject. This also gave her a strong background in business and marketing. Please visit Piper’s website at www.pipermackayphotography.com.

Posted in: General, Nature Photography

Leave a Comment (0) →

The Power Of Light

Piper1_BV2U2017-Version-2I recently posted the above image on FB and it became one of my top 20 images posted. Let’s be serious, it is a portrait of a buffalo. There are so many images that have required huge amounts of effort, uncomfortable accommodations, beans and rice, long drives, sand storms, harsh rains, impossible muddy roads, and yet it was a photo of a Buffalo that the crowd went wild over? This is the perfect proof that the reaction was not about the subject, but instead to the light and the emotion it created.

When we first pick up the camera, we are told there is good light and bad light. We go on thinking this for years as we click away. However, there are all different types of light, all day long, that can be a creative tool for the photographer who understands how to use it. While we cannot control the natural light source, we can learn how to manipulate the light through creative camera settings and simple tools. Light on a subject is one of the most powerful tools we have to convey drama, mystique, and emotion. The use of light in a photograph can be the deciding factor between an amazing image and boring or terrible one.

Learning to use natural light should be a prerequisite for all photographers before spending a lot of money purchasing expensive flash and lighting gear. When I first picked up the camera, workshops teaching dramatic natural light either did not exist or there were so few, I did not know of them. This is what inspired me to create Spirit-N-Light workshops. It was through my tribal photography that I started to study how other photographers in other genres such as fashion photographers and commercial photographers used light. Slowly, I taught myself how to use flash and off-camera flash, which was thrilling. This is what ultimately elevated my wildlife photography, as I was no longer satisfied with “over the shoulder light”, and I was constantly seeking out dramatic light.

Pushing to use available natural light to create drama, mystique, and emotion in my wildlife photography subsequently made using natural light the most powerful tool in all my photography. I became increasingly frustrated with lighting equipment failures and the slower set up process. I found using natural light to be much more powerful and freeing. It also creates more engaging photographs with my subjects than when you have flashes going off. In hindsight, it would have been much easier to learn how, when, and why to use an artificial light source if I had had a solid grasp on how to use natural light first.

The concept that I like to get across during the Spirit-N-light workshops is that it is a given that your subject is exotic. If you have picked up the camera and are ready to click, I am assuming you are excited about your subject and it is exotic to you, whether it is a rock or a lion. So, forget about your subject and ask yourself, “what is the light and how does it impact my subject?” Even a rather plain subject in dramatic lighting, such as a buffalo, will always make for a more dynamic image than a great subject in bad or flat light. Once you understand the power of light you will notice it everywhere in your everyday life and it will broaden your creative horizons.


lens cap


 

Piper Mackay is a world, wildlife and cultural photographer, based in Long Beach, California. She believes compelling visual images help to protect what is right in the world. Her work takes her to very remote locations, living cross culturally in the villages and environments that she is documenting.

Her work is heavily concentrated on the African continent, a land she fell in love with when she first touched foot on it’s rich red soil. Her passion for the natural world has grown into a lifelong commitment to inspire others to explore, respect and preserve the beauty of our fragile planet.

She believes compelling work comes when you invest time, living the stories you are trying to tell. It is important to interact and gain the trust of those whose stories you are telling, especially when sensitive and complicated. The world has enough images of poverty, pain and disaster, much more needful is imagery that reveals the beauty and dignity of the communities that are, except by their geography and circumstances, very similar to our own. Powerful images help shape the view of the world and play an important role in disseminating how cultures and wildlife are coping with the rapid changes happening in the developing world.

Piper’s images have been displayed at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, The Museum of History and industry, and The Art Wolfe gallery, as well as local galleries. Her work has been featured in Nature and travel publication through representation of several photo agencies, including Rangefinder, Nature’s Best, Birders, and the World Wildlife Fund. She is an independent photographer and available for assignment work.

Her prior career in the fashion industry, where she was deeply involved with combing color and texture, has greatly enhanced her approach to the unique look and feel of each culture and photographic subject. This also gave her a strong background in business and marketing. Please visit Piper’s website at www.pipermackayphotography.com.

Posted in: General, Nature Photography

Leave a Comment (0) →

TECHNIQUE – Top 5 Tips for Quality Image Files (part 2)

 

histogram

Cloud forest vegetation, Costa Rica

KNOW YOUR HISTOGRAM

If you don’t use your histogram, you’re putting yourself at risk of underutilizing the information that your fancy DSLR camera (which truly is an amazing machine!) can capture. The histogram allows you to ensure that you’re getting as much tonal information as possible in your images, and it also allows you to focus on capturing the detail you want for certain important parts of any scene. As discussed above, the amount of information in RAW files does allow for a fair amount of post-processing without degrading the image too much. Nonetheless, getting the best exposure possible in-camera is going to mean a better final image, and you’ll also be more satisfied with your effort when you get it right.

The histogram is a big help in this regard but many people seem mystified by it. It’s actually quite simple. The histogram is basically a bar graph in which the x-axis represents the total range of tonal values in a given image from 0 to 255. That is, even in color images, there are 256 possible shades of monochromatic tonalities or luminance values, from pure black (0) to pure white (255). The y-axis indicates the number of pixels having a specific luminance value.

You’ll also see color histograms but most professional nature photographers will tell you that they don’t use these very much if at all. The only time I use them is to check the red channel in a scarlet macaw or maybe the blue in a specific flower or a hummingbird like the violet sabrewing. The consensus among the other pro nature photographers that I know, however, seems to be to master the use of the monochromatic/luminance histogram. Indeed, I have my camera set to display only this histogram by default.

histogramOne often hears that a classic bell-curve is a “good” histogram. Nothing could be further from the truth, and as an aside I think the obsession with having no bright highlights and no dark shadows has led in part to the current HDR craze (that’s a story for another post though!). That said, there are many images for which a bell-curve will indeed be a great histogram.

In the nesting toucan image above, for instance, you can see that the majority of the luminance values are clustered in the center of the x-axis. This makes sense because there are a lot of middle-toned greens
and earth tones in the image. At the tails of the graph (the left and right edges), there are many fewer pixels with extreme dark or light luminance values. And indeed, the values stop just before the left and right edges of the histogram, meaning that I have detail in the darkest and brightest parts of the image.

histogramAs this glass frog image shows, however, there is no one “good” histogram. The correct or optimum histogram will vary depending on the image. Glass frogs are nocturnal so the black background, in addition to being graphically pleasing for this image, is perfectly natural. It gives a very different histogram than the more classic toucan image above but one that is equally correct.

Note that there is a big spike of values pushed up against the left side of the histogram. This means that there are quite a lot of woefully underexposed, pure black areas. I wanted the background to be black, and so it is. You’ll also notice that there are varying luminance values represented by the dark greens and lighter greens in the image but that, importantly, there are no pixels at the right edge of the histogram. Again, this is fine for this image as there are no values that are white or even close to it. Had I put a flash on the leaves in the background in order to make the background green, the histogram would indeed have been closer to a bell-curve. That’s not what I wanted for this image though

histogramAbove is another example of a non-traditional histogram but one that is entirely correct for this image. Note here that there is a big spike that bumps up against the right edge of the histogram. This means
that there are lots of overexposed highlights; in fact, a spike this big and this close to the edge means that these values are pure white and that they contain no recoverable detail. If I had wanted this image to be a silhouette of bird and tree against a cloudy sky, I would be in big trouble because the whites are blown. Of course, that wasn’t the intention here so the overexposed whites are just fine.

 


lens cap


About the author Gregory Basco
Like many nature photographers, I started my career doing something else. A political scientist by training, my research focused on the politics of the environment in Latin America. I researched environmental politics and ecotourism in Costa Rica and worked here for a number of years as a conservation professional, having first come to the country in 1992 as a Peace Corps volunteer. I now dedicate myself full-time to my own photography and my Costa Rica photo tour company. I work out of my home office in Costa Rica’s central highlands, where I live with my wife, twin boys, our dogs and cats, and various hummingbirds and songbirds that visit our backyard feeders. Visit Greg’s galleries, store, and workshops at Deep Green Photography.

Posted in: General, Photography Gear

Leave a Comment (0) →

Photo Friday: Cold Water Flowing

 

Canon 5D MarkOn February 1st eastern Nebraska received measurable snow, something that hasn’t happened very frequently in the last couple of years. Not only was it a good amount, but it was also wet and sticky snow that clung to everything. I ventured out before the wind could blow the snow off the branches and hiked into a winter wonderland at Platte River State Park. I followed the creek for a ways and found a few areas where the water flowed past the snow and ice. I got low to the ground to show the little cascade and used a wide angle to show all the great snow clinging to the environment. In the background one of the bridges that crosses the little stream complimented the scene nicely and I included this detail. I spent quite some time at this spot enjoying the quiet snow falling all around.

Technical Details:
Canon 5D Mark II, 16-35 f/4l lens @ 16mm, f/18, .6 s,
Platte River State Park, Nebraska

lens cap

 

MEET THE AUTHOR

Derrald_Farnsworth-Livingston

While growing up, Derrald’s parents took him on several trips across the United States to numerous national parks. It was on these trips that Derrald grew a love for the outdoors which we wished to explore and share with others. Photography was a natural result, an endeavor that Derrald began at a young age and continued to explore in years to come.

While pursuing a Bachelors degree at Creighton University, he enrolled in all of the photography courses. With these courses he learned the fundamentals of chemical darkrooms, light, balance, and exposure. After college he continued to explore the art and develop his own technique and style and choose to focus on nature and scenic photography as his primary subjects, although he is not hesitant to point the lens at anything.

Amongst the images of majestic mountains and the crashing waves of the ocean, one can find photographs of the prairies, lakes, and wetlands of the American Great Plains and Midwest. Some of these images are the artist’s favorites as they show the expansive heartland of the United States and the subtle beauty of the area surrounding his home. Through the right balance of subject, composition, and light, Derrald strives to transport the viewer into the composition.

Derrald has won numerous awards and exhibited in several solo and group shows regionally. His work has also appeared in several regional and national magazines, calendars, websites, and postcards. He continues to live and work in Omaha with his family.

Visit Derrald’s website Journey Of Light Photography http://www.journeyoflight.com/blog/ to read his other articles. His images may be ordered from his store at http://store.journeyoflight.com.

Posted in: General, Nature Photography

Leave a Comment (0) →

Photographer’s Guide To Bryce Canyon National Park

 

Earth shadow tints the sky over Thor's Hammer in pastel shades of blue and pink in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. (Bret Edge)

Earth shadow tints the sky over Thor’s Hammer in pastel shades of blue and pink in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah. (Bret Edge)

I first visited Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park in 2005.  Melissa and I spent a half day touring the overlooks before unanimously deciding that we were unimpressed and should move on to a more interesting location.  In 2012 I was passing by Bryce Canyon on a motorcycle trip when something compelled me to give it another shot.  I rode through a summer monsoon storm along the scenic drive to the end at Rainbow Point, stopping at each overlook to enjoy the view.  I don’t know what inside of me changed but this time, I was awestruck.  I called Melissa and convinced her we needed to plan a trip to Bryce.  She reluctantly agreed.  We came back with our son later that summer and she too was surprised to find herself fascinated by this marvelous canyon.  We camped for two days and hiked among the fanciful hoodoos.  I’ve gone back a couple more times in the last year and am already eagerly planning another trip.

You would think it relatively easy to create beautiful photographs at a place this scenic.  You would be wrong.  Bryce Canyon is a complex place.  Finding a cohesive composition in the right light requires careful study.  Though I’ve visited a number of times I have exactly one photo from Bryce that I consider print-worthy and only half a dozen or so that are marketable (excluding outdoor adventure photographs).  With this post I hope to share a few lessons I’ve learned over several visits that may help to increase your chances of producing quality images.

General Strategies for Photography at Bryce Canyon National Park

The vast majority of overlooks at Bryce Canyon face more or less east so in the morning you’re essentially shooting into the sunrise.  Yes, there are exceptions at some of the side canyons but generally speaking you’ll greet the morning sun head on.  Use this to your advantage!  The light that Bryce Canyon is famous for is that soft, warm glow of reflected light and at Bryce it is strongest at sunrise.  The red hoodoos and badlands absorb sunrise light and bounce it onto the backsides of hoodoos, filling in shadows and giving the entire scene an amazing radiance.  Use a small aperture (i.e. f/16 or smaller) to create a sunburst just as the sun creeps above the horizon.  If you’re including sky in your composition be prepared to deal with the extreme dynamic range between bright sky and darker canyon.  In the past I used graduated neutral density filters.  Now I blend exposures by hand using luminosity masks and am far more pleased with the results.

Don’t stop photographing right after sunrise.  Mid to late-morning is also excellent as you’ll still find wonderful reflected light even hours after sunrise.  This is also a good time to utilize longer focal length lenses to isolate hoodoos or features inside the canyon for a more intimate view.

Afternoon and sunset is a more challenging time to photograph at Bryce Canyon.  The setting sun casts long shadows into the canyon at most overlooks and only the tops of the hoodoos are bathed in light.  Don’t give up though!  Ten to thirty minutes after sunset you may find a pastel pink and blue sky appear above the canyon – Earth Shadow – and a soft glow upon the landscape.  This light is exquisite and very easy to work with as it is low in dynamic range; you can usually record the entire scene in a single exposure.  Clouds may also offer an opportunity for sunset photography as they bounce light into the canyon, filling in some of the shadows just enough to prevent them from completely blocking up.

Choosing the right lens for photography at Bryce Canyon can be challenging.  You will be tempted to go wide by the seemingly endless views but beware of distortion that causes hoodoos on the edges of the frame to bend outward.  I’m not suggesting that you keep your wide angle lenses stashed away – just know that you will need to make some perspective corrections in post-processing.  There are a couple of ways to avoid this: use a tilt/shift lens or stitch two or more frames together to create a single image.  If I had one, a tilt/shift lens would be my first choice.  If you choose to stitch photos together I recommend that you use a moderate focal length of around 50mm and shoot in a vertical orientation.  This technique is often used to create panoramic photographs but if you only use two or three frames you can create an image with a normal aspect ratio.  Another benefit to this technique is that the final image will likely be of a higher resolution than a single-frame photograph.  Go ahead and make those large prints!  Jim Goldstein wrote an excellent tutorial titled “Mastering Digital Panoramic Photography” that I highly recommend for those of you who are new to this technique.

Every season has something to offer at Bryce Canyon.  Spring temperatures are very pleasant and wildflowers begin to bloom, adding dashes of color to the landscape.  In the summer, dramatic storm clouds build almost every afternoon.  Aspen leaves turn bright yellow in fall and contrast sharply against dark evergreens.  Winter snows create unique and peaceful scenes and also drive away most tourists but be prepared for brutally cold conditions.

Locations to Photograph at Bryce Canyon National Park

What Bryce Canyon National Park lacks in size it more than makes up for in opportunity, which is to say that you’ll find yourself in a target rich environment the moment you cross into the park.  Familiarize yourself with the park before you arrive by visiting the Bryce Canyon National Park website.  Here you can read the aptly named park newspaper, “The Hoodoo“, which also contains valuable information about hiking trails and a good map that provides a birds-eye view of the park.  For a map with more detail I highly recommend the National Geographic Trails Illustrated topo map, #219.

Locations that follow are listed in the order in which they appear as you drive through the park beginning at the park boundary just outside of Bryce City.

Fairyland Canyon

I only discovered Fairyland Canyon last year and have yet to make a dynamic image there.  That said, I believe this relatively small overlook has tremendous potential.  The hoodoos below are densely packed into the canyon with Boat Mesa rising to the south.  In August I found colorful rabbitbrush blooming alongside the trail and ominous monsoon storm clouds in the sky.

Sunrise Point

You don’t need solid detective skills to deduce that Sunrise Point is a great spot to photograph sunrise.  However, it is also one of the better spots for sunset photography.  Sunrise Point is on the northern side of Bryce Amphitheater, which is also overlooked at Sunset, Inspiration and Bryce Points.

Sunset Point

I find the views from Sunset Point a little more interesting than those from Sunrise Point.  I wouldn’t call them better – just different.  Sunset Point is a very popular overlook and is often crowed with tourists.  Despite the name, I don’t recommend it for sunset photography unless you’re lucky enough to have great clouds to bounce light into the canyon.  There are some good opportunities here for panoramic photography.

Thor’s Hammer

A short walk down the trail from Sunset Point delivers you to an exceptional view of Thor’s Hammer, perhaps the most famous hoodoo in Bryce Canyon.  I’ve photographed Thor’s Hammer at sunrise, mid-morning and after sunset and all are good for photography.  The image at the top of this post was made 10-15 minutes after sunset using a 24-105mm lens at 47mm.

Wall Street

While you’re at Sunset Point you might as well hike the Navajo Loop that descends into the canyon through Wall Street.  It’s a steep hike but passing below towering walls glowing with reflected light is not-to-be-missed if you’re in shape to safely do the hike.  Look for an impossibly tall pine tree framed on two sides by huge canyon walls – this is an iconic location for photography at Bryce Canyon.

Inspiration Point

This is my favorite viewpoint at Bryce Canyon.  It’s fantastic at sunrise and early to mid-morning but may also offer some great options for sunset photography.  I also find this to be the best location for panoramic photography.  Instead of walking up to the designated overlook veer left and walk along the Rim Trail until you find a perspective that grabs your attention.

Bryce Point

Bryce Point is my second favorite location in the park.  It is on the southern side of Bryce Amphitheater and provides views looking mostly north and east.  It’s great at sunrise and, depending on the conditions, you may find some good sunset opportunities.

Rim Trail

If you enjoy hiking, the Rim Trail runs between Fairyland Canyon and Bryce Point, passing each overlook along the way.  I can’t recommend this hike strongly enough.  Along the way you will pass endless views into the canyon, many of which are as good, if not better than, the designated viewpoints.

Natural Bridge

I like to photograph Natural Bridge (technically an arch, not a bridge) in mid-morning.  The sun is high enough in the sky that it nicely illuminates the features around the arch and bounces ample light onto the underside of the arch, giving it a nice, warm glow.  This is a difficult area to work as you must stay behind the railing and there are a few small trees that require you to be creative with your composition.  But, it is a fascinating location.

Agua Canyon

Agua Canyon affords spectacular views looking east into the massive expanse of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.  Directly in front of the overlook are a couple dramatic hoodoos, one of which, The Hunter, is quite similar to Thor’s Hammer.  I’ve not been at this location for sunrise but I suspect it could be good.  Late-morning light fills the canyon below, eliminating harsh shadows, and sheds light onto The Hunter.

Rainbow and Yovimpa Points

Admittedly, I’ve never photographed at either of the two viewpoints at the very end of the park road.  I find the views less impressive and more open overall.  That said, I do believe there is potential at both overlooks.  At Yovimpa Point you are looking roughly south, which may offer impressive sunset opportunities.  Rainbow Point faces north and east.  You may find good light in the morning or afternoon.  The Bristlecone Loop is a relatively easy 1 mile loop that passes some interesting bristlecone pine trees.  These trees often make interesting subjects for intimate and abstract photographs in soft light.

Inner Canyon

Pick a trail, any trail, that descends into the canyon and start hiking.  It won’t take long and you’ll be surrounded by huge canyon walls, funky hoodoos, arches and twisted old trees.  The entire character of the landscape changes dramatically when you immerse yourself in the canyon.  Some of my favorite inner canyon hikes are the out and back to Tower Bridge, Queen’s Garden Loop and Peek-A-Book Loop.  You will find interesting subjects to photograph in any season and at any time of day.  A word of caution: it’s always much easier going down than coming back up and the park may close trails throughout the year due to ice, snow and/or rockfall.

Wildlife

If you’re a long lens kind of person you’ll find an ample supply of wild creatures to photograph.  Deer, pronghorn, squirrels and a variety of birds are all commonly seen.  Meadows between Bryce Point and Swamp Canyon are often populated by grazing deer among the pines.  Less common but also native are black bears, bobcats and porcupines.

By no means is this a comprehensive guide of every location worth photographing in Bryce Canyon National Park.  Rather, it is a starting point. I wrote it with the hope that it might save you some time and effort as you plan a trip to this most amazing location.  Enjoy!

Looking for some visual inspiration? Here’s a gallery of my photographs of Bryce Canyon National Park.

COMING SOON: eFotoGuide – Essential Guides to Photographing the National Parks and Beyond

 

don zeck lens cap

 bret edgeBret Edge is a nature and adventure photographer in Moab, Utah. His interest in photography evolved as an extension of his life long passion for the outdoors. He is an avid hiker, backpacker, mountain biker and canyoneer. A visit in 1999 to an exhibit featuring photographs by Ansel Adams, Jack Dykinga and David Muench stoked Bret’s creative fire such that he immediately purchased his first SLR camera, a Canon Rebel. In the years since, he has traveled extensively throughout the American West creating a diverse portfolio of dynamic images.

Bret’s work has appeared in magazines, calendars, travel guides and advertising campaigns. His clients include Backpacker magazine, Popular Photography, the Utah Office of Tourism, Charles Schwab & Co. and Jackson Hole Mountain Guides.

While Bret enjoys seeing his work in print, he receives the most satisfaction by helping others realize their potential as photographers. He accomplishes this by leading several group workshops each year and guiding photographers on private photo excursions. For information about his workshops and guided excursions, visit www.moabphotoworkshops.com. To view a collection of Bret’s images, visit www.bretedge.com.  Bret lives in Moab with his wife, Melissa, their son Jackson, and two All-Terrain Pugs named Bierstadt and Petunia.

 

 

Posted in: General, Landscape Photography, Photography Destinations

Leave a Comment (0) →

Motivation By Connection

Anyone who follows my blog will know I often talk about the importance of individuality, creative vision and uniqueness when it comes to photography. I always find it fascinating to hear from other photographers about their discoveries regarding both self and practice as they advance throughout their career. Being able to form a connection with others regarding similar thoughts and experiences motivates me by reminding me that I’m not alone in my struggles and that this does in fact not come easy to anyone.

It’s funny that we have to remind ourselves constantly about things like that. It’s pretty simple to understand, yet it’s all to easy for us to assume that others produce their best work straight away. To be honest, this is a large part of what motivates me to write this blog; Being able to share experiences, struggles, discoveries and change with the hope that others can both relate and be motivated in their endeavours.

 

Shoreline Details - Killarney, Ontario

 

I came across this Ansel Adams interview done by the BBC the other day and wanted to share it here on the blog. Among many things throughout the interview, I found it very interesting when Adams talks about and shows examples of his prints including multiple variations of the same one created over a number of years. Adams talks about how his feelings change throughout time which contributes heavily to different choices made when printing. He refers to his famous line “The negative is comparable to the composer’s score and the print to its performance. Each performance differs in subtle ways”.

I’m sure that we all can relate to these thoughts in a sense that images never seem to be complete. I know that at any point, I can look back at older work and find specific details that I now would approach differently. It’s embracing these moments with the realization of our progress that is the important thing; not stopping to get frustrated with ourselves for the so-called “mistakes” we made. It’s exciting to think about what lies ahead in this journey, and how our values, vision, likes and dislikes will change over time. Photography teaches us not only to see the world around us more clearly but also ourselves.

Click here to watch a video of Ansel Adams.  There are countless other great interviews with Adams to be found on YouTube.  Being able to hear the thoughts and opinions from one of the masters is extremely interesting and exciting. 

 

don zeck lens cap 

 MEET THE AUTHOR

Kyle McDougallKyle McDougall is a landscape photographer/workshop leader based out of Ontario, Canada.  He specializes in creating fine art images that touch on both a visual and emotional level.  When not outside exploring the land you can find Kyle online sharing his images and helping others through his instructional articles.  In 2012 Kyle was chosen by Photolife Magazine as one of Canada’s Emerging Photographers.  To view more of his work please visit his website: www.kylemcdougallphoto.com

 

 

 

 

Posted in: General, Photography

Leave a Comment (0) →

Namena Soft Corals 5

What can be better than photographing sunset? How about photographing sunset while underwater? A number of variables had to perfectly come together in order to shoot this scene, including the soft corals, colorful anthias, and dramatic low-angle sunlight. I especially like the dramatic sunbeams penetrating beneath the waves. I created this image using my Canon

Coral Photography

5DmkIII and a Tokina 17mm f3.5 lens inside my Ikelite 5DmkIII housing with an 8″ dome port and dual DS160 strobes. I processed the RAW file using Aperture 3 and Photoshop CS6, plus Nik Software’s Color Efex 4‘s white balance filter.

 

Don Zeck Lens Cap

MEET THE AUTHOR

Jon Cornforth photographing surf on the North Shore of OahuJon Cornforth is an award-winning wilderness photographer whose images have been recognized internationally for their masterful composition and incredible detail. He’s compelled to express the beauty of the natural world through his photography, traveling all year, challenging himself in new locations and documenting the unique creatures who live there. All of his images are captured in the wild. He believes in supporting environmental groups and raising awareness through photography. He lives in Seattle, WA with his wife, Daisy, daughters, Maddy and Chloe, and Boston terrier, Buni.   

Click here to visit Jon’s website.   

Cornforth Images are copyright protected. Cornforth Images are available to be licensed for a fee and can not be used without permission.

Posted in: General

Leave a Comment (0) →

Sources Of Inspiration

capitol-reef-leaf-mud1a

For the second instalment of “Sources Of Inspiration” I’m excited to feature Greg Russell and share with you his beautiful images and thought provoking writing. Greg is a landscape photographer based out of California who specializes in images of the American West. I first met Greg online a couple of years ago and was immediately drawn to his images. Soon after, I was introduced to his blog and found another side of his work that was equally as impressive. 

In a day where the majority of photography related articles are technical related, Greg chooses to focus mainly on the why over the how. His words showcase a strong connection with the land and always leave me thinking deeply about my own work and how I interpret the environment around me. His philosophical style of writing touches on not only image making, but also creativity, life and the personal decisions that are so important in creating unique works of art. Greg does a brilliant job delivering his message and his words always leave me with a strong sense of place.  His images are extremely well crafted and display a contemplative thought process that ultimately defines his personal style. I know that whenever I see one of Greg’s new images that it has been created through a love, appreciation and understanding of his subject. His intimate compositions of the world are refreshing on the eyes and provide a truly unique experience for the viewer.

As artists, we all go through high points and low points. I know that the times I’m lacking inspiration I can turn to work such as Greg’s to remind myself about how beautiful the simple things in life are. I certainly recommend visiting Greg’s website and blog to view more of his images and writing. I’ve included links to a few select posts below to get you started. While you’re there, make sure to subscribe to his blog, you will be glad that you did!

 Don Zeck Lens Cap

 MEET THE AUTHOR

Kyle McDougallKyle McDougall is a landscape photographer/workshop leader based out of Ontario, Canada.  He specializes in creating fine art images that touch on both a visual and emotional level.  When not outside exploring the land you can find Kyle online sharing his images and helping others through his instructional articles.  In 2012 Kyle was chosen by Photolife Magazine as one of Canada’s Emerging Photographers.  To view more of his work please visit his website: www.kylemcdougallphoto.com

 

Posted in: General, Landscape Photography

Leave a Comment (0) →